All you need to know about music for video games

arcade musicWhereas movie soundtracks are commended for years, until 2005 video game music has been largely a curiosity outside Japan. It’s only recently that concerts consisting solely of video game music, such as Play! A Video Game Symphony and Distant Worlds: Music from Final Fantasy, have sold thousands of tickets around the globe.

Some games today are even promoted on the strength of the soundtracks’ primary composers. By way of instance, the 2008 Xbox 360 game Lost Odyssey promoted in its pre-release advertisements that its music was written by legendary composer Nobuo Uematsu. Unfortunately, however, royalty free game music composers and artists remain underappreciated compared to people involved with film soundtracks. With the increasing Popularity of the Internet in the late 1990s, an internet video game music community started to form. Among the first websites, VGMusic, offered and continues to supply rigorous MIDI sequences, largely of elderly NES and SNES consoles. Contributors to VGMusic sequence songs and then submit them to the world to listen to.

From 1998, the community Consisted largely of independent websites offering MIDI and Impulse Tracker *.it files. A few of these tunes, which started to move towards remixing as it’s known now, were mashups of 20 minutes of music from an entire game’s soundtrack. Looking for tunes was a tedious job, because there were not any one-stop resources for such remixes. In 1999, OverClocked ReMix, a Website that restricted its postings through strict juding, has been formed. Still popular today, the website has received contributions from amateurs, aspiring artists, and specialist composers like Jeremy Soule. A panel of judges evaluates and votes on every submitted tune, and in the time of this writing, fewer than 5 percent of admissions are posted.

Compos or online contests that challenge Participants to create the best tunes, began to look around 2000, but took a hit when the heavily vaunted Ultima Eternity competition folded. Afterwards, live tool recordings became popular, resulting in the production of Dwelling of Duels, a contest where at least one live tool is expected in a song. Every month, competitors are expected to translate a piece from a particular game or series, and members of the favorite game music discussion The Shizz vote for the winners. Also popular early in the decade was VGMix, which was possibly the first website that enabled composers to post music without judging. VGMix lived through three unique iterations, but a lot of its music was lost because of security violations. As of this writing, the website is now in a state of disrepair, with lots of its attributes broken and enrollment disabled.

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